What is Marketing Attribution?

Flora Rowe, 
Strategy Development Exec, 

We would like to think that a visitor finds your blog or clicks an ad, and immediately converts it into a sale or lead.

Unfortunately, that is rarely the case. Today, people will visit your site several times prior to converting. Attribution models are used to assign credit to the different touchpoints in the customer journey & help us understand the increasingly complex path to conversion.

Imagine Jai, Renisha, Flora and Jasleen are all making a cake together:

  • Renisha Gets out the ingredients, weighs each of the ingredients and then puts them into a bowl.
  • Flora then mixes the ingredients together, greases the cake tin and pours in the mixture.
  • Jai heats the oven, puts the cake in the oven to cook and then sets a timer.
  • Jasleen then takes the cake out once it is cooked, lets it cool and then ices the cake.
  • But who gets the credit for making the cake?

How much credit each click gets

1. First Click Attribution

If we were to use first-click attribution, Renisha would be given all of the credit for making the cake as she was the first touchpoint. Jai, Flora and Jasleen would be given no credit.

2. Last Click Attribution

If we were to use last-click attribution, Jasleen would be given all of the credit for making the cake as she was the last touchpoint. Jai, Flora and Renisha would be given no credit.

3. Position-Based Attribution

If we use position-based attribution, we think that the first and last touchpoints are the most important touch points in the consumer journey and 40% of the credit is given to the first and 40% of the credit is given to the last. The remaining 20% is split between the other touchpoints.

In this case, we would be saying that Renisha made 40% of the cake, Jasleen made 40% of the cake and Flora and Jai would split the remaining 20% of the credit.

4. Linear Attribution

If we were to use linear attribution, Jasleen, Jai, Flora and Renisha would all be given equal credit for making the cake.

5. Data-Driven Attribution

Data-driven attribution uses past data to work out which touchpoints are the most important for the conversion. In this case, the amount of credit Jai, Jasleen, Renisha and Flora are given varies depending on the data Google has.

6. Time Decay Attribution

If we were to use time decay attribution, Jasleen would be given all of the credit for making the cake as she was the last touchpoint, Jai would be given the second most credit, then Flora and Renisha would be given the least amount of credit as she
was the first touchpoint.

 

We can use different attribution models to better understand the customer journey & help us understand which keywords, Ad Groups, Ads and Campaigns contributed to conversions.